Posts Tagged ‘ Joe Eisma ’

Morning Glories, End of Season 1 (Comic Review)

(This is a review of issues 13-25 of the Image comic Morning Glories. My first review is here.)

cover to Morning Glories #17

Morning Glories

Nick Spencer and Joe Eisma’s Morning Glories completed its first “season” with issue #25, and it has definitely stayed interesting. There are some implications that it may collapsing under its own weight: The past six months have featured the first real delays so far, and there are now enough characters that Eisma’s art doesn’t manage to keep them all visually distinct. On the other hand, the story itself has held together. Given how rare it is for mysterious, twist-driven stories to work out, I’m amazed by how well this is doing. Sadly, when I look back through my comic reviews, I see that series almost never improve with time, and I’m almost always disappointed when I decide to stick with a mediocre one that shows “potential”. In this case, though, Morning Glories has definitely gotten better with time.

This is mainly due to the way Spencer handles his twist-driven storytelling. Every issue reveals more, though there are still plenty of questions, and you wouldn’t take me seriously if I tried to explain the number of secret pasts and hidden motivations in this comic. However, almost every new change is fair and consistent with previous hints. Most stories like this just feel like 100 random things that all happened to a small group of people. Here, all those events can be traced back to just a few common causes, and that makes a huge difference. As things have come to a climax, the cliché of “sorry, there’s no time to explain!” has appeared more often than I’d like. Admittedly, though, everyone who says that really is in a hurry. I am a little worried about the number of things thrown into the mix in those last few issues, but not as worried as I was about the few issues right before my last review. That time, there turned out to be reasons for everything.

Also, Spencer really can write memorable, compelling stories. I’ve been reading comics sporadically in the past several months, but it was never a problem to return to this complicated series after taking a long break. In fact, at this point the characters have broken into so many different groups that someone who is reading the issues as soon as they come out will still need to keep track of plot threads last seen a few months ago.

The overall plot moves slowly now that it’s jumping between so many people, but even that isn’t a problem. Every issue has a satisfying amount of events and new information, so it always feels like a good deal.

Morning Glories isn’t perfect, of course. Part of the reason it’s easy to remember characters is that most of them have exaggerated personalities. Also, with a series like this, how you feel about it depends largely on how excited it can make you about future issues. It definitely has me hooked now, but if it goes downhill, it will retroactively drag these issues down with it. Even so, I’ve spent much of the past few years expecting Morning Glories to jump the shark, and it’s consistently proved me wrong. This first season has been a perfect example of how to make a story full of mysteries work out. I’m ready to have faith in it.

Grade: A-

 
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Morning Glories (Comic Review)

(This is a review of issues 1-12 of the Image comic Morning Glories. These can also be found in the first two collected volumes of the series.)

Morning Glories issue #1 cover

Morning Glories

Students usually feel like they are fighting against their school, but what if that school really were trying to kill them? That is the central hook of Morning Glories, a comic about six students newly recruited to a prestigious, but sinister, private academy.

It’s a silly idea even on its face, because any school with the body count shown here would end quickly. It might make for a fun miniseries, but Morning Glories is intended to be a long-running series. Amazingly, author Nick Spencer seems poised to make it work by not only examining the “what if?” question, but also considering why a school would want to kill its students. Twelve issues in, we don’t have a lot of answers, but there are quite a few hints about a centuries-old movement (possibly religious, possibly looking for an answer to a legitimate threat) testing children to find ones with some sort of special power. With enough suspension of disbelief to assume that their secret society could cover up the deaths and maintain their school’s prestigious reputation, this actually makes a twisted sort of sense.

Artist Joe Eisma does a passable job portraying the often dialogue-heavy story, with distinct characters and expressive faces and postures (even if he does favor a few generic body types).His linework features the occasional jarring angle and could definitely use a strong inker to give it depth, but it’s better than many DC and Marvel artists. Best of all, he is one of the few Image artists who can keep anything close to a monthly schedule .

But the art is really just a delivery mechanism for the story that dominates this comic. It’s defined by the many mysteries and constant twists, with each new issue providing a good chunk of plot and new information. Though the story is not unfolding in any hurry, it certainly can’t be accused of decompression or padding. Reading it as a serialized work, it delivers something new every month.

The plot points offer a lot of variety, from tweaking everyday aspects of school life (teachers, cheerleading squads, and guidance counselors) to completely unexpected surprises (ghosts, underground prisoners, and a strange device that intrigues cutting-edge physicists). Spencer almost seems scared to go a single issue without defying expectations, and the tone of each issue varies widely, too, from horror to graphic violence to understated suspense.

The characters started as a typical Breakfast Club-style collection of cliches. Though they haven’t gotten much deeper (this comic’s strength is in unexpected twists, not character development), they have defied expectations. In these first twelve issues, every one has either turned out to have a shocking history or faced things within the school that played off their basic archetype in surprising ways. There are also varying allegiances among the school staff and at least one organization seeking to destroy them from the outside.

It’s a lot to take in, and if anything, the concern is that Morning Glories will turn out to be one of those stories that piles the mysteries on but doesn’t know how to resolve them. That was my initial impression of this, but fortunately I re-read the series so far in preparation for this review. Taking in every issue at once, a lot of the pieces fit together better than I had expected, and the total number of open mysteries was not as large as it had seemed. (Most importantly, and a little embarrassingly, I hadn’t noticed before that one person had played a role in at least three characters’ life stories. What I’d thought to be three unrelated pieces of information all tied together neatly.) It’s strange, because this had seemed to be the perfect series to read for the monthly surprises, but now I can see a strong argument for following it in larger collected chunks. Either way, though, the mysteries seem well fleshed out, and the few explanations to date have been satisfying, so it seems that Spencer does know what he’s doing. He says that he has this planned out until an ending around issue 100, and the build-up so far seems fair given that schedule.

It’s always hard to know whether to trust a title whose main draw is mysteries and plot twists. Many high-profile works that took that approach fizzled out disappointingly (look at X-Files or Lost), but a low-stakes creator-owned comic like this arguably has a better chance of holding true to a vision. Whatever the final result is, Morning Glories has at least turned out to be a worthwhile read so far. The memorable hooks and new questions keep this interesting month after month.

Grade: B